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Growing of Articular Cartilage at the Joint (Movement of Fetus in womb)

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Scientists have just discovered why babies need to move in the womb to develop strong bones and joints. It turns out there are some key molecular interactions that are stimulated by movement and which guide the cells and tissues of the embryo to build a functionally robust yet malleable skeleton. If an embryo doesn’t move, a vital signal may be lost or an inappropriate one delivered in error, which can lead to the development of brittle bones or abnormal joints. Cells in the early embryo receive biological signals that direct them to contribute to different types of tissue, and in different places. For example, our bones need to be made of strong and resilient material to protect and support our bodies, whereas our articulating joints (e.g. our knees and elbows) need to be able to move smoothly. As a result, at joints, bones need to be covered in smooth, lubricated cartilage. Cells in the early embryo are thus directed to make a decision to either form bone or cartilage, depending on where they are.

Know more about this research at Orthopedics

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New research on the strength of children’s bones could help in the design of safer car seats

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Researchers have successfully used computer simulated models and medical imaging to test the strength of young children’s bones, producing results which could help car seat manufacturers design safer car seats for young children.These non-invasive techniques created 3D models of the femur (thigh bone) in the study of children’s bones in the newborn to three-year-old age range.Protection has improved significantly since the introduction of car seats but car accidents are still a leading cause of life threatening injury in children. Computer aided engineering is an essential part of vehicle development and safety assessments are increasingly relying on simulations. Therefore, it is vital that the correct simulations, using accurate models, are used to ensure optimum safety.

Know more about the designing of safer car seats at Orthopedics.

Hormone therapy helps reduce curvature of the spine

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Medical researchers have found that hormone therapy (HT) use was associated with a reduction in vertebral fracture risk. A new study shows these same benefits may also guard against a woman’s risk of developing hyperkyphosis, an exaggerated curvature of the spine that creates a forward stooped posture.

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Patients may live longer after hip replacement, study suggests

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Hip replacement surgery not only improves quality of life but is also associated with increased life expectancy, compared to people of similar age and sex. The researchers analyzed postoperative survival rate in nearly 132,000 patients undergoing THA in Sweden from 1999 through 2012. Average age at hip replacement was about 68 years. During a median follow-up of 5.6 years, about 16.5 percent of patients died.

Survival after THA was longer than expected, compared to people of similar age and sex in the Swedish general population. In the first year, survival was one percent better in THA patients versus the matched population. The difference increased to three percent at five years, then decreased to two percent at 10 years. By 12 years, survival was no longer different for THA patients compared to the general population.The survival difference was significant mainly among patients diagnosed with primary osteoarthritis.

Read More @ Orthopedics

Multi-faceted approach to diagnosing carpal tunnel syndrome recommended

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New guidelines recommend the collective use of a thorough patient history and specific physical examination maneuvers, in addition to observation and specific diagnostic tests to more definitively diagnose carpal tunnel syndrome, a common source of hand numbness and pain affecting approximately 3 million Americans — primarily women — each year.

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Association between migraine, carpal tunnel syndrome found

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Patients with carpal tunnel syndrome are more than twice as likely to have migraine headaches, reports a new study. Patients with carpal tunnel syndrome have symptoms such as hand numbness and weakness, resulting from pressure on the median nerve in the wrist.

More @ Orthopedics.

Know more about bone structure of your own hand and feet!!!

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The fingers and toes of our hand and foot is made up of phalanx bone. Whereas the midfoot is a pyramid-like collection of bones and includes the three cuneiform bones, the cuboid bone, and the navicular bone. The Hind part of foot is made of ankle and heel. Wrist bone of hand is connected to phalax that is fingers with a bone called metacarpals.

Know more @ Orthopedics.